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the-fandoms-are-cool:

sociopath-for-hire:

rumshop:


Saying ‘what kind of an idiot doesn’t know about the Yellowstone supervolcano’ is so much more boring than telling someone about the Yellowstone supervolcano for the first time.

School teaches you that ignorance is shameful, rather than being a person’s default AND ENTIRELY FIXABLE state. Sucks the fun outta learning, if you let it.

Will always reblog.

the-fandoms-are-cool:

sociopath-for-hire:

rumshop:

Saying ‘what kind of an idiot doesn’t know about the Yellowstone supervolcano’ is so much more boring than telling someone about the Yellowstone supervolcano for the first time.

School teaches you that ignorance is shameful, rather than being a person’s default AND ENTIRELY FIXABLE state. Sucks the fun outta learning, if you let it.

Will always reblog.

(Source: erisollsprite, via bardofmind)

OVERHEAD PROJECTOR I AM EXCITED

OVERHEAD PROJECTOR I AM EXCITED

moxieangel:

theblueboxonbakerstreet:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

jellobatch:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: An inside look at ADHD.

Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Me 100% of the time. Luckily Ito help for my ADD when I was a child

fun facts!

  • ADD and ADHD are the same disorder, Attention Deficit Disorder was officially renamed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in 1994. Many people use ADD to refer to Type One presented here, and ADHD to refer to Type Two, but they are the same core disorder.
  • In many cases where ADHD carries into adulthood, it’s a genetic issue [My grandfather, mother, siblings, and I have all been diagnosed with ADHD], though this does not always occur.

hello yes this is me

more fun facts!

  • there are a lot of talks about how ADHD is overdiagnosed, and that may be true for boys, but for girls ADHD is severely underdiagnosed.
  • older studies mostly looked at hyperactive boys and that’s the perception we have of ADHD. because of this many girls will go undiagnosed until adulthood.
  • most girls/women who have ADHD are inattentive type. they tend to be introverted, disorganized and daydreamers. 
  • girls will internalize these as personal failings and teenage girls have a much higher rate of suicide and self harm because of it
  • ADHD is often comorbid with anxiety and depression, both of which are caused by the failings from having ADHD
  • depression can present itself differently in people with ADHD. it’s more of a discouragement from constantly failing, but it can be just as debilitating.
  • read this article from the atlantic: It’s Different for Girls with ADHD

themoreyouknow.jpg

WHOOP WHOOP GIRL WITH ADHD REPRESENT

(via cs-elliot)

hconover:

Danny is a greyhound and a novel way of encouraging pupils at Oakhill primary school in Tamworth, Staffordshire, to read aloud. "It helps with their self-esteem in reading out loud because he is non-judgmental," says the dog’s owner. "He doesn’t judge them and he doesn’t laugh at them."
"The Dogs Who Listen to Children Reading" / The Guardian

hconover:

Danny is a greyhound and a novel way of encouraging pupils at Oakhill primary school in Tamworth, Staffordshire, to read aloud. "It helps with their self-esteem in reading out loud because he is non-judgmental," says the dog’s owner. "He doesn’t judge them and he doesn’t laugh at them."

"The Dogs Who Listen to Children Reading" / The Guardian

(via rollomutt)

squearnish:

"i don’t need to write that down, i’ll rememb—" 

do NOT

(Source: cyberist, via richdork)

“We often hear about U.S. teachers being paid poorly for all the work they do to educate children. But did you know that 63 percent of teachers report buying food for the classroom each month with their own money?”

More Than Half Of Teachers Report Buying Hungry Students Food With Their Own Money

I know at my mom’s school, teachers worked with parents to make sure children had food, clothes, school supplies, medical care. Kids who didn’t have running water in their homes (no, I’m not kidding) were given access to the showers in the gym and teachers would do their laundry. Teachers drove families who didn’t have cars to their doctor and dentist appointments, allowed kids in extracurriculars who needed to be at school early to go to band contests or football and baseball games to stay at their house overnight so they could drive the kids in early the next day. At Christmas, teachers pooled resources to help parents get together Christmas presents and dinners, so kids could have Christmas meals. My mom, an elementary school principal, drove her former students in high school to distant colleges so they could see campuses they couldn’t visit otherwise and helped them with college and financial aid applications. My parents gave families, free of charge, a car, a washer and dryer, musical instruments my brother and I no longer used, and they weren’t the only teachers or other parents in the community who did the same for kids and families in need.

I know there are bad teachers, but my experience being raised by an educator and being surrounded by teachers was that teachers love their students and want what is best for their students. They will do whatever they can for kids and their families if they think it will help the kids succeed. The teachers in my life were overwhelmingly examples of dogged, selfless dedication. I know so many teachers now who have worked well past when they could retire because they still love teaching, because they love the kids, because they want to make the world a better place.

Teachers are amazing people, and instead of discrediting them, blaming them for all the problems with our education system, and replacing them with less expensive and less qualified people who will be in and out of the profession in a couple of years, we should be doing our best to seek out and support the people who have this kind of passion and commitment to the hard work of educating children. 

What this should also tell us is just how many kids are going hungry right now, and how vitally important it is that we continue to invest in children. SNAP benefits, Medicaid, subsidized housing…all of these things are vitally important to school success. A child can’t do well in school if they are hungry, sick, and homeless or worried about becoming homeless, and you’d be hard pressed to find teachers who have never encountered students who have dealt with one or all of these challenges, except maybe in the wealthiest school districts. Taking care of kids should be one of our biggest priorities, and sadly, it’s turned into some sort of political game to see who can be the most committed to poverty shaming and anti-government, no matter who is hurt in the process. It’s sickening.

Education is important. Children are everything. We need to invest more into both. Now I’ll get off my soap box.

(via robot-heart-politics)

(via heythisisbecky)

bill-rinaldi:

olgaulanova:

epic-humor:

zenpencils:

WHAT TEACHERS MAKE by Taylor Mali

see more

three snaps in a Z formation

Reblogging as my sister is a Teacher and if i had to choose a secondary career path I would probably be a teacher as well!

I was a substitute teacher for awhile, best damn sub the kids ever had! haha

Still one of my favorite things of all time.

Valedictorian Speaks Out Against Schooling (by Erica Goldson)

This is the video that comic comes from. It’s very good.

Please reblog if you think grades DO NOT reflect a student’s intelligence.

jeremymckinnonsbuttblog:

samofthedead:

intartarus:

I am doing some reasearch for an essay for english, and I would really apreciate if you could help me.

The opposite can be found here

In most cases, I’ve found grades reflect time management…

school’s doing it wrong

MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES

MULTIPLE

SAY IT WITH ME NOW—INTELLIGENCES.

GRADES REFLECT ONLY WHAT IS TESTED. SOME TEACHERS ARE BAD AT TESTING. SOME STUDENTS ARE BAD AT TESTING.

YOU KNOW WHAT THEY STILL ARE? INTERESTING, INTELLIGENT PEOPLE WHO CAN SHOW THEY ARE INTELLIGENT IN WHATEVER COMES NATURALLY OR BY effort because even as I shout about multiple intelligences not everyone can just BANG be intelligent by appropriate stimulus. And that’s okay.

You know what’s not okay? Grades being a measure of worth.

(Source: yukirnura, via feu-et-fleurs)

“We praise people for being “naturally” smart, too, “naturally” athletic, and etc. But studies continue to show, as they have for some time now, that it is generally healthier to praise schoolchildren for being hardworking, than for being naturally gifted. We know now that to emphasize a child’s inherent ability places pressure on that child to continue to be accidentally talented, which is something that is hard for anyone to control. When the children who are applauded for their natural skills fail, they are shown to take the failure very personally. After all, the process of their success has always seemed mysterious and basic and inseparable from the rest of their identity, so it must be they who are failing as whole people. When students are instead complimented and rewarded for their effort and improvement, they tend to not be so hard on themselves. When they fail, they reason, “Well, I’ll work harder next time.” They learn that they are capable of success, rather than constantly automatically deserving of it, and they learn simultaneously that they are bigger and more complex than their individual successes or failures.”
— Kate of Eat the Damn Cake, The Stupidity of “Natural” Beauty (x)

(via sweetsamofmine)

teach4thekiddos:

If you are a teacher or going to be… Watch this!!!

If you are not a teacher.. WATCH THIS!  

I love this and I am so glad someone put this into words. 

This has seriously been one of my favorite things of all time since the first time I heard it.

(via richdork)